About


This blog is my contribution to narrowing the gap between theory and practice in mathematics teaching and learning. It contains teaching tips based on current reforms in mathematics education and teaching such as teaching mathematics through problem solving (TtPS), developing higher-order thinking skills (HOTS) and mathematical habits of mind, constructivist teaching, scaffolding learning, etc.

I believe that K-10 mathematics is about developing students’ mathematical thinking and communication capacities in the context of learning mathematics. Experience and education have also taught me that mathematical thinking, communicating mathematically, and mathematics are best learned in the context of solving problems and doing mathematical investigations.

I love to develop mathematical tasks and activities that involve basic mathematics concepts but has the potential to engage both teachers and  students in higher level thinking. I am particularly interested in students’ learning trajectory for specific content topic.

My work includes doing research in mathematics teaching, writing curriculum materials and facilitating professional development programs for mathematics teachers. I taught mathematics for 8 years before my current work.

Use the space below to e-mail me.

3 Responses to About

  1. erlines says:

    Check my post on subtracting integers using numberline. The first number is the initial position hence start at -4. The minus sign is to be interpreted as going to the left. The sign of 7 which is negative is to be interpreted as do the opposite. This means instead of going to the left as instructed by the minus sign you go to the right by 7 units. This process can also be represented by -4 + 7. In my post I described why I do not advise this way of teaching subtraction operation using directed distance because there are too many rules to remember.

    Check my other three posts on subtracting integers. Thank you.

  2. La Tonia says:

    How would you show -4-(-7) on the number line using directed difference

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